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Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some  ...
Tibetan tantric rugs are the seats of power generally employed by practitioners of esoteric Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism. These rugs typically depict a flayed skin of an animal or human, or in some instances as seen here, a full body skeleton surrounded by - in this instance grinning - human skulls. This skeletal form should not however be confused with the Buddhist deity Chitapati, as depicted on the newer rug shown here made circa 2010, which has two skeletal deities, one male and the other female, usually seen dancing wildly with their limbs intertwined. The practitioner sits upon these types of rug, or uses them to place his ritual utensils on. The ceremony performed often celebrates the detachment from the earthly body that advanced Buddhist practitioners strive to attain. (In India, some sadhus - or Hindu holy men – meditated and preached while seated on a flayed tiger skin rug rug - which were made in Tibet to depict tiger skins - and also used in similar circumstances for ‘similar’ rituals as those used in Buddhism.) The imagery of a skeleton or flayed skin of an animal or human is a very potent symbol and to those unfamiliar with such rugs, they often appear at first to be frightening or menacing, but upon a closer look, and putting ones prejudices aside, this old piece, even to the layman, emanates a friendly non threatening ‘vibe’ with its grinning skulls. (Note the different ‘feel’ in the other example of a similar carpet – in our own collection and not for sale - but with interchanging menacing and grinning skulls surrounding the main figure.) The carpet for sale here consist of only three colours, a naturally dyed red, and a white and brown that are the natural colour of the sheep's wool as shorn. Both the warp and weft are of a very fine hand spun wool, overall size 1.15m x 0.89m (45.25” x 35”), and was made circa the early 1800’s, (i.e. certainly not later than 1850). Except for some fraying at either end, and low pile in parts, it is in very good condition. Except for some fraying at either end, and low pile in parts, it is in very good condition. As these old skeletal rugs are rare, especially in good condition, they are very seldom seen in private collections, hence this is a unique opportunity for a serious collector to acquire a piece.
price:  SOLD. Thank you!