Back
    Beautiful, small Pre-Columbian tie-dyed textile. This is a very colorful and enduring object of ancient textile art dating from A.D. 400 - 800.  It has been conserved  ...
    Beautiful, small Pre-Columbian tie-dyed textile. This is a very colorful and enduring object of ancient textile art dating from A.D. 400 - 800.  It has been conserved  ...
    Beautiful, small Pre-Columbian tie-dyed textile. This is a very colorful and enduring object of ancient textile art dating from A.D. 400 - 800.  It has been conserved  ...
    Beautiful, small Pre-Columbian tie-dyed textile. This is a very colorful and enduring object of ancient textile art dating from A.D. 400 - 800.  It has been conserved  ...
Beautiful, small Pre-Columbian tie-dyed textile. This is a very colorful and enduring object of ancient textile art dating from a.d. 400 - 800. It has been conserved to a backing and mounted for display the size is 20 x 17 inches as mounted. The actual textile size is 16 x 14 inches. This charming little fragment is a beautiful example of a very complex weaving and dying process. It has a pleasing 'stepped' - almost mihrab-like design. This "stepped" design is one of the most ancient of all Andean design motifs. Thought to represent a sacred mountain or "Apu" and the the man-made stepped platforms or stepped pyramids which simulated these sacred mountains for the people of the Andes. Woven in the Nasca region of the South Coast of Peru it was once part of a larger tunic. More complicated than it appears, the weave is a delicate, glauze-like balanced plain weave in a discontinuous warp and weft structure. During the weaving process these elements were woven using temporary "scaffolding" yarns to connect them. Once off the loom, the individual stepped forms - woven in plain white alpaca yarns were separated into each individual stepped element and the tied off tightly in the places where the diamond shaped forms were wanted - so that these areas would not take on dye. This tying off method created the white diamond-shaped forms of the finished product and the gold colored diamond shapes once the multi-step dying process was complete. The separated and tied pieces were dyed in several different dye baths creating the green, yellow, purple and red colors seen in the textile. Separate indigo and cochineal dye baths created the purple and red areas and an unknown yellow dye over a pale indigo - the green. After all dying was complete the pieces were carefully reassembled using a needle to create the "dovetail" join for the warps. Finally, the weft slits were loosely sewn up creating the finished textile. This time consuming and complicated process required tremendous skill and patience and was done in this way to create a special, prestige cloth for ceremonial occasions. Because in the Andean region weavers never cut pieces of cloth into various shapes. By tradition, all textiles had to be woven and finished on the loom in the desired final form. This discontinuous warp and weft scaffold weaving method was invented in the Andes and was employed for the creation of important prestige cloth. This combination of complex weaving and dying processes is not known to have occurred outside the Andes and is unique in the history of fiber arts. Images of a few other fragments of this unique weaving structure and technique are available upon request, but this little gem is my favorite. Very satisfying.
price:  Inquire