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Pre-columbian tie-dyed fragment. This charming little fragment is a beautiful example of a very complex weaving and dying process.  It has a pleasing 'stepped' - almost mihrab-like design.  Made in  ...
Pre-columbian tie-dyed fragment. This charming little fragment is a beautiful example of a very complex weaving and dying process.  It has a pleasing 'stepped' - almost mihrab-like design.  Made in  ...
Pre-columbian tie-dyed fragment. This charming little fragment is a beautiful example of a very complex weaving and dying process. It has a pleasing 'stepped' - almost mihrab-like design. Made in the Nasca region of the South Coast of Peru under Wari influence. It dates to around a.d. 400 - 800. It was once part of a larger tunic or mantle. More complicated than it appears, the textile was first woven in a discontinuous warp and weft structure that created the step-like elements seen here using white - undyed alpaca yarns. The weave is a delicate, glauze-like balanced plain weave with a discontinuous warp and weft structure. During the weaving process these elements were constructed using temporary scaffolding yarns to connect them. Once off the loom, the individual stepped forms were separated and tied off tightly in the places where the diamond forms appear so that these areas would not take on any dye. This tying off method created the white diamond forms of the finished product as well as the other diamonds after the multi-dying process was complete. The pieces were dyed in several different baths creating the green and yellow and the purple and red colors seen in the textile. Indigo and cochineal dye baths created the purple and red areas and an unknown yellow dye over indigo - the green. After this dying was complete and all the ties were removed - each strip was then reassembled with the warps dovetail joined and the weft slits loosely sewn up to create the finished textile. This very time consuming and complicated process required tremendous skill and patience and was done in this way to create a special, prestige cloth for ceremonial occasions and also because in the Andean region weavers never cut pieces of cloth into various shapes - all had to be woven and finished on the loom in the desired form. This combination of complex weaving and dying processes is not known to have occurred outside the Andes and is unique in the history of fiber arts Size: 14 x 16 inches. This fragment is conserved to a backing cloth but should be sewn to another backing cloth and framed for best effect. Various other fragments of this technique are available on request.
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