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Uzbekistan – Julkhur tribal, four-panel, all wool rug. Julkhur rugs are very unusual in their construction, made in a way that contributes to their bold appearance. They are initially woven in narrow  ...
Uzbekistan – Julkhur tribal, four-panel, all wool rug. Julkhur rugs are very unusual in their construction, made in a way that contributes to their bold appearance. They are initially woven in narrow  ...
Uzbekistan – Julkhur tribal, four-panel, all wool rug. Julkhur rugs are very unusual in their construction, made in a way that contributes to their bold appearance. They are initially woven in narrow  ...
Uzbekistan – Julkhur tribal, four-panel, all wool rug. Julkhur rugs are very unusual in their construction, made in a way that contributes to their bold appearance. They are initially woven in narrow  ...
Uzbekistan – Julkhur tribal, four-panel, all wool rug. Julkhur rugs are very unusual in their construction, made in a way that contributes to their bold appearance. They are initially woven in narrow  ...
Uzbekistan – Julkhur tribal, four-panel, all wool rug. Julkhur rugs are very unusual in their construction, made in a way that contributes to their bold appearance. They are initially woven in narrow  ...
Uzbekistan – Julkhur tribal, four-panel, all wool rug. Julkhur rugs are very unusual in their construction, made in a way that contributes to their bold appearance. They are initially woven in narrow panels, then stitched together. Another unusual characteristic is that the knots are tied onto the wefts of the foundation, instead of onto the warps, and there are an unusually high number of weft passes between each row of knots, as many as 8 to 10. The large number of wefts and the unusual way of tying the knots covers the yarns on the back, such that one cannot see the bases of the knots. The word, “Julkhur” comes from the Arabic word for a bear skin—a name inspired by the long pile resembling an animal skin. The word is thought to have entered the language when the Arabs invaded Central Asia in the 8th century. The long pile of these rugs made them useful as bed or sitting rugs. Julkhurs are made by both Turkmen Ersari and Uzbek peoples. This example has motifs typical to Turkmen rugs, and may have been made by Ersaris living on the Uzbek side of the Amu Darya river. Circa second part of 19th Size: 95″ x 51″ – 243 cm x 128 cm
price:  O.R.